Need Extra Cash? 15 Items You Can Make And Sell

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Need Extra Cash? 15 Items You Can Make And Sell


There are plenty of ways to make a little extra cash on the side. Reselling thrift sweaters on Poshmark, delivering fast food for Grubhub, or even pet-sitting through a site like Rover.

The truth is this: side hustles are something that we’re all either thinking about, doing, or want to be doing at this point in time.

If you enjoy a little crochet after a long day of work or baking on the weekends, you can totally look to your hobbies for a means of money-making.

The list of what you can make and sells for a side hustle is potentially endless, but I’m going to help get you started here. Here’s a look at 15 homemade items you can make and sell, plus, where you can sell these handcrafted goodies.

1. Baked goods

At your age, retirement probably feels like a long way off. You’re just planning your meteoric rise up the corporate ladder.  While you don’t need to make out the guestlist for your party just yet, it’s not too soon to start thinking about retirement. You might even consider how to invest in your retirement using Bitcoin. Bitcoin? Retirement? Really?  Technology has powered rapid changes in our lives. Internet searches replaced encyclopedias. Smartphones replaced landlines. Netflix replaced Blockbuster.  Bitcoin isn’t sending traditional savings into retirement right now, but it’s worth investigating as part of your long-term financial planning. A Bitcoin refresher Just as the internet, smartphones, and Netflix enhanced our access to knowledge, communication, and movies, technology has opened the doors to a variety of different individual investments, including IRAs. Bitcoin first went public in 2009, when its enigmatic creator, Satoshi Nakamoto, shared the idea behind it. Featuring peer-to-peer online trading and a decentralized nature, Bitcoin grabbed the attention of tech-savvy people tired of traditional finance and banking. Bitcoin has plenty of fans who view the cryptocurrency as an ideal alternative to traditional cash or precious metal coins. Unlike other forms of wealth, Bitcoin doesn’t originate from, nor is it controlled by, any banking organization or government entity. Users can buy Bitcoin using fiat currency and store it in their Bitcoin wallets. In the cryptocurrency’s early days, individuals could mine bitcoins via computer algorithms, but these days buying is your best option. With Bitcoin, network processing joined via a common ledger has replaced the centralized control of a banking system. Any transaction gets recorded to a blockchain, which gets distributed to all user accounts. Bitcoin doesn’t need one gatekeeper because everyone with an account has access to oversight. You can use bitcoins to pay for various purchases, including food, travel, video games, music, and even charitable donations. You can’t walk into your favorite local spot and put some bitcoin down on the bar, but you can make online payments by sending a portion of your bitcoins to the seller’s address. Bitcoin also has a growing fan base in unbanked or underbanked areas, bringing added virtual financial services to locations where they’re desperately needed. You shouldn’t cut up all your credit cards in favor of Bitcoin just yet, though. But as Bitcoin gains popularity and shines as the gold standard of cryptocurrency, some investors want to make it part of their retirement portfolio. Some basics on investing for your retirement Before I jump into Bitcoin-funded retirement, let’s talk about traditional retirement wisdom and options. First up: when should you start saving for retirement? That’s an easy one. NOW. If you’re nearing the big 3-0, start now. If you’re in your 20s, start now. If you’re in your 40s, start yesterday. Since time travel isn’t possible, start — you guessed it — now. According to research from the Federal Reserve, 25% of people have nothing saved for retirement. That’s millions of people with no financial safety net other than Social Security.  You’re going to have a really tough time celebrating your retirement if you have no way to pay your bills. When you can’t even cover the basics, kicking back and enjoying your days without a desk or a boss will be next to impossible. That’s not who you want to be when you grow up. If you start saving for retirement at 25, you should have one to one-and-a-half times your salary socked away by the time you hit your mid-thirties. Are you on track to meet those guideposts? Great. If you don’t, you shouldn’t beat yourself up. You SHOULD start your retirement savings right away. What are some traditional retirement savings options? Traditional retirement savings options include: 401(k). An employer-connected account you build via pre-tax deductions from your paycheck. 403(b). Like a 401(k) for people who work for a non-profit organization or educational institution. IRA. Stands for Individual Retirement Account. They're not connected to your job, IRAs are open to everyone. You may find tax-deductible traditional IRAs, post-tax Roth IRAs, or SEP IRAs for anyone self-employed.  Bitcoin breaks with tradition The investment market tends to hold fast to tradition, though during uncertain economic times, savvy investors think about breaking with conventional practices in favor of more creative alternatives. Bitcoin was first on the scene and has earned the most name recognition among cryptocurrencies. Still, it’s not the only altcoin out there. Bitcoin was the pioneer, but you can currently find more than 4,000 cryptocurrencies out there. Other crypto includes: Ethereum (ETH). Litecoin (LTC). Cardano (ADA). Chainlink (LINK). Dash. Monero (XMR). Polkadot (DOT). Bitcoin Cash (BCH). Binance Coin (BNB). Ripple (XPR). Stellar (XLM). Tether (USDT). Tron (TRX). While Bitcoin is a financial newbie compared to precious metals, cash, stocks, mutual funds, and IRAs, we can’t ignore its mainstream appeal. Still, some worry about the cryptocurrency’s staying power and its volatility. While Bitcoin is not likely to replace any of the traditional retirement options, you may consider adding it to your post-employment planning. With Bitcoin, you can diversify your portfolio and add some excitement to your retirement savings. What is a Bitcoin IRA? Bitcoin IRAs are individual retirement accounts that enable you to invest in Bitcoin or other types of cryptocurrency. These Bitcoin alternatives are known as altcoins. While the Internal Revenue Service does not back any particular accounts for crypto, the organization views Bitcoin as equivalent to stocks and bonds for tax purposes. The decision to treat bitcoins and altcoins as property means a custodian is necessary for regulatory compliance. Most IRA custodians focus on more traditional assets, such as stocks, bonds, money markets, and CDs. However, as Bitcoin enhances its mainstream popularity, you’ll see more companies taking on this specialized role. Bitcoin IRAs are self-directed IRAs (SD-IRAs). These SD-IRAs are gaining traction, though they require more of your personal attention than other investments might. They also require you to choose a custodian to maintain the account (I’ll get to that in a minute). In addition to investments in assets like real estate, gold, silver, and tax liens, SD-IRAs can hold crypto.   You probably won’t see crypto investment offerings from your employer’s retirement plan in the near future. Bitcoin has a reputation for volatility. Since retirement plan sponsors are responsible for liability surrounding their featured investments, they most likely won’t take the risk. Crypto boasts of decentralization. No government agency regulates it, but global governments are starting to take notice as popularity increases. Given that the IRS considers crypto similar to stocks or bonds, many financial professionals don’t classify altcoins and other cryptos as distinct types of assets. Industry pros may be fonder of blockchain technology and its lasting potential than of crypto as an asset. How do you start making Bitcoin part of your retirement strategy? Remember, Bitcoin might be part of your retirement investment strategy. You wouldn’t close all of your accounts to put everything you have into one stock, no matter how hot it seems to be (at least you shouldn’t). The same is true of Bitcoin. When Bitcoin is a portion of your diversified retirement portfolio, you can withstand short-term concerns about its volatility while waiting for long-term gains. When you’re ready to add Bitcoin, use a Bitcoin IRA. You can go it alone, which requires some crypto homework, or you can enlist the help of a pro. When you choose to DIY, be sure to pay close attention to Internal Revenue Service regulations. Though Bitcoin itself is decentralized, the IRS imposes limits, and it bans certain transactions. You’ll also create a self-directed IRA and a limited liability company (also known as an LLC) to serve as the organization for purchasing and selling Bitcoin for IRA purposes. The do-it-yourself route is trickier due to complex compliance issues and the higher risk of theft. This route requires in-depth crypto knowledge plus serious financial and investment chops. Aka, it's not recommended. On the other hand, if you go with a professional, you get the advantages of diversifying your portfolio with Bitcoin without as much hassle or homework. Think of it like ordering takeout from a great restaurant—you get to enjoy the meal without doing all the prep work. Bitcoin IRAs require special skills, even for professionals. These crypto retirement vehicles not only require extensive knowledge of cryptocurrency trading but also of enhanced data protection and management. How do you start your Bitcoin IRA journey? With the extra attention that these alternative assets require, traditional financial services or investment firms don’t offer a Bitcoin IRA option (yet). You’ll need to find a firm to help you get started. Just as you would with any investment, you should do some background research. Every firm has unique qualities and requirements, and you want one that matches your investment vibe. Some excellent sources for Bitcoin IRA custodians include: BitcoinIRA. BitcoinIRA is the most established in the Bitcoin IRA game. It’s secure and features easy account setup and use. You need to invest a minimum of $3,000 to start. BitIRA. BitIRA stores digital assets offline for heightened security, and it backs its protection with unlimited insurance. You need $5,000 to open your account. iTrustCapital. With low fees and minimum investments, iTrustCapital is great for Bitcoin IRA newcomers. The minimum account balance is $2,500. CoinIRA. CoinIRA excels at user experience, offering an educational guide to cryptocurrency IRAs and dedicated consultants to guide you through the process. The minimum starting balance is high at $20,000. Equity Trust. Equity Trust boasts nearly 40 years of experience with self-directed IRAs, and now it offers crypto IRAs as well. The low starting balance of $500 makes it an attractive option for beginners. Alto. Alto features a variety of alternative investment options, including several types of crypto. With no minimum balance to start, no setup fees, and no extra exchange fees, it’s a good place to dabble. IRA Financial Trust. IRA Financial Trust touts a reputation built on user choice and minimal costs. It doesn’t require a minimum balance; plus, it gives you the power to choose your own crypto exchange. It’s perfect if you know about crypto but haven’t built a financial empire yet. Each of these sites offers Bitcoin, as well as other crypto trading and investment options. Each has different minimum account requirements and different fees. They all offer 24/7 access, crypto knowledge, and reliable reputations in this specialized space for alternative assets. Do a little online homework to see if one speaks to you and meets your crypto IRA needs. What are some advantages of a Bitcoin IRA? In the investment world, there are no absolutes. No investment type is all good or all bad. Each comes with advantages and disadvantages. Bitcoin IRAs are no exception. Benefits of adding this investment vehicle to your retirement planning include the following. Going global When you have Bitcoin, you hold global currency. The crypto is recognizable worldwide and works in the same manner wherever you may be. Growing potential Right now, Bitcoin and crypto have plenty of room to grow. Since Bitcoin hit the scene, it’s been on an upward trend surpassing other markets. If value accelerates rapidly, your Bitcoin IRA may have a positive impact on your retirement funds. Since your retirement is far off on the horizon, you can play the waiting game. Diversifying your portfolio A solid investment strategy relies on diversifying your retirement portfolio even if you’re sticking with more traditional types of investments. Diversity is even more crucial when you talk about alternative assets like Bitcoin or other forms of crypto. Adding a Bitcoin IRA brings fresh excitement to your portfolio and adds a layer of protection to your retirement savings in case of a drastic market downturn or financial upheaval that causes distress with traditional market products. Looking to the future Fans of Bitcoin IRAs believe playing the long game is worth it, which means putting their faith in crypto’s mainstream and financial growth. If you have four decades until retirement, you may be more willing to gamble with this part of your portfolio and put your money on altcoin’s future potential. Of course, nay-sayers continue to point out crypto’s instability and volatility.  Saving on taxes Using Bitcoin to invest in specific kinds of accounts may give you the power to steer clear of steep capital gains taxes, though you may still face other fees. When you have crypto as a regular taxable investment, capital gains tax will impact your purchase and sale transactions. When you use the tax shield of diversifying your assets and putting Bitcoin in a self-directed IRA coupled with a crypto wallet, you can lessen your tax burden. Whether you settle up with the IRS now or in the future depends on your choice of a Roth IRA or a traditional IRA. With Roth IRAs, you pay taxes at the start and your gains are tax-free. With traditional IRAs, you pay Uncle Sam when you withdraw the funds. Do Bitcoin IRAs have any drawbacks? Nothing’s perfect—though a great burger and fries come close. Of course, Bitcoin IRAs have some downsides: Doubling up When you choose a Bitcoin IRA, you will need a separate retirement account for your traditional investments. Just as conventional funds cannot handle Bitcoin, crypto custodians don’t manage stocks and bonds. To ensure a diverse portfolio, you’ll have to open and maintain at least two retirement accounts with different servicers for each of these asset classes. Navigating uncertainty Though Bitcoin’s popularity continues to rise, most experts still see crypto as a speculative investment subject to volatility and drastic value fluctuations. With thousands of cryptocurrency choices available, you can’t say for sure which will last and which will disappear unless you have magical powers. Some experts predict an overall crypto crash, while others foresee massive growth. Unless you have magical powers, you don’t know what the future will bring. If you discuss your concerns with a professional, you can choose a fund composed of a variety of crypto to alleviate some of the uncertainty. Lacking value metrics Unlike stocks, with crypto, you don’t have any share of corporate ownership backed by company earnings. Bitcoin and other altcoins have value in pricing that changes daily. Meeting the minimum Compared to more traditional IRAs, Bitcoin IRAs may require significant minimum investments. An online search of the different custodians will allow you to compare minimum investments to find one that works for you. Paying a price You may pay higher fees for a self-directed IRA. By comparing providers, you can find one with fees that suit your budget and comfort level. Don’t let the high costs at one company price you out of the game.  Limiting your options Certain custodians limit your power and choice, only giving you the option of trading on affiliated currency exchanges. Others allow more leeway and let you choose according to preference. If you’re in the know and desire a specific crypto exchange, check to see if your Bitcoin IRA custodian will give you that option. Counting your losses You already know the good news when it comes to Bitcoin IRA tax advantages. Ready for the bad news? With traditional investment accounts, if you suffer a capital loss, you recoup by deducting those losses or balancing out other gains. This type of recovery isn’t possible with Bitcoin IRAs because of their existing tax benefits. Keeping tabs Though the companies I mentioned above are custodians of your Bitcoin IRA, keep in mind that they’re still new and may not provide as much oversight as traditional brokers, advisors, or financial service firms do. The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) does not have any powers to supervise Bitcoin custodians. Remember, decentralization is in Bitcoin’s DNA. While these firms should have your best financial interests at heart, they do not have requirements to operate under the same fiduciary regulations as the more traditional players. Summary None of us knows what the future holds, but what’s life without a bit of risk? If you want to create some diversity and adventure in your retirement savings, now’s the time—especially if you have several decades before you get to cut the cake at your retirement celebration. Bitcoin IRAs may offer huge rewards, but they come with higher-than-normal risks. If you want to dabble in Bitcoin IRAs while mitigating potential losses, your best bet is to make sure that these alternative investments represent 10% or less of your retirement portfolio. Read more: Investing In Bitcoin: Everything You Need To Know Before You Buy The Top 10 Things You Need To Know About Bitcoin - Baked goods

If you’re like me, you may be more comfortable with a spatula than a sewing needle. If that’s the case, consider selling homemade baked goods.

If you decide to pursue this option, keep in mind that items made for consumption have special regulations, called cottage food laws. Most states require your personal baking utensils and equipment be different than those you use for business, and some states even require a completely separate kitchen. Additionally, you may need certain licensing and perhaps an inspection to do business in your own kitchen. Research your state’s laws, available through your local occupational or health department, on selling food from home.

While your ingredients may cost nothing more than a little pocket change per cookie or muffin, be sure to calculate additional expenses, like labor, taxes, cupcake liners, and even website maintenance and business cards. All in all, you’ll probably spend up to $2 per baked good for production, so aim to sell your treats for $4-$5 to make a decent profit.

2. Necklaces

Handmade necklaces have a number of advantages over store-bought alternatives.

You can design these accessories to your liking (or your friends’), and the tools are relatively inexpensive, especially compared to the cost of a single accessory. DIY necklaces can even meet practical needs. Create a decorative chain to attach to your mask or use silicone beads to create a teething necklace for moms of babies.

Since designs and materials are so varied, the cost of production and pricing for this product can be difficult to pin down, but a quick Google search can give you tons of candle-making ideas. And just search “candles” on Etsy to learn how much you can sell your own creations for.  

3. Soaps

Have you ever tried to read the list of ingredients in your body wash? Not only is it filled with words I don’t know, but I can hardly pronounce most of them (and I’m a professional writer)!

Handmade bar soaps, body scrubs, and even bath bombs are particularly trendy products because so many consumers today truly care about what they’re putting on their bodies. Not only that, but buyers interested in zero waste practices love the lack of plastic in products like bar soaps versus bottled body wash.

Typically, bar soaps cost just a few dollars to produce (in bulk), but artisan bar soaps sell for twice, sometimes three times that online.

4. Macrame goods

At your age, retirement probably feels like a long way off. You’re just planning your meteoric rise up the corporate ladder.  While you don’t need to make out the guestlist for your party just yet, it’s not too soon to start thinking about retirement. You might even consider how to invest in your retirement using Bitcoin. Bitcoin? Retirement? Really?  Technology has powered rapid changes in our lives. Internet searches replaced encyclopedias. Smartphones replaced landlines. Netflix replaced Blockbuster.  Bitcoin isn’t sending traditional savings into retirement right now, but it’s worth investigating as part of your long-term financial planning. A Bitcoin refresher Just as the internet, smartphones, and Netflix enhanced our access to knowledge, communication, and movies, technology has opened the doors to a variety of different individual investments, including IRAs. Bitcoin first went public in 2009, when its enigmatic creator, Satoshi Nakamoto, shared the idea behind it. Featuring peer-to-peer online trading and a decentralized nature, Bitcoin grabbed the attention of tech-savvy people tired of traditional finance and banking. Bitcoin has plenty of fans who view the cryptocurrency as an ideal alternative to traditional cash or precious metal coins. Unlike other forms of wealth, Bitcoin doesn’t originate from, nor is it controlled by, any banking organization or government entity. Users can buy Bitcoin using fiat currency and store it in their Bitcoin wallets. In the cryptocurrency’s early days, individuals could mine bitcoins via computer algorithms, but these days buying is your best option. With Bitcoin, network processing joined via a common ledger has replaced the centralized control of a banking system. Any transaction gets recorded to a blockchain, which gets distributed to all user accounts. Bitcoin doesn’t need one gatekeeper because everyone with an account has access to oversight. You can use bitcoins to pay for various purchases, including food, travel, video games, music, and even charitable donations. You can’t walk into your favorite local spot and put some bitcoin down on the bar, but you can make online payments by sending a portion of your bitcoins to the seller’s address. Bitcoin also has a growing fan base in unbanked or underbanked areas, bringing added virtual financial services to locations where they’re desperately needed. You shouldn’t cut up all your credit cards in favor of Bitcoin just yet, though. But as Bitcoin gains popularity and shines as the gold standard of cryptocurrency, some investors want to make it part of their retirement portfolio. Some basics on investing for your retirement Before I jump into Bitcoin-funded retirement, let’s talk about traditional retirement wisdom and options. First up: when should you start saving for retirement? That’s an easy one. NOW. If you’re nearing the big 3-0, start now. If you’re in your 20s, start now. If you’re in your 40s, start yesterday. Since time travel isn’t possible, start — you guessed it — now. According to research from the Federal Reserve, 25% of people have nothing saved for retirement. That’s millions of people with no financial safety net other than Social Security.  You’re going to have a really tough time celebrating your retirement if you have no way to pay your bills. When you can’t even cover the basics, kicking back and enjoying your days without a desk or a boss will be next to impossible. That’s not who you want to be when you grow up. If you start saving for retirement at 25, you should have one to one-and-a-half times your salary socked away by the time you hit your mid-thirties. Are you on track to meet those guideposts? Great. If you don’t, you shouldn’t beat yourself up. You SHOULD start your retirement savings right away. What are some traditional retirement savings options? Traditional retirement savings options include: 401(k). An employer-connected account you build via pre-tax deductions from your paycheck. 403(b). Like a 401(k) for people who work for a non-profit organization or educational institution. IRA. Stands for Individual Retirement Account. They're not connected to your job, IRAs are open to everyone. You may find tax-deductible traditional IRAs, post-tax Roth IRAs, or SEP IRAs for anyone self-employed.  Bitcoin breaks with tradition The investment market tends to hold fast to tradition, though during uncertain economic times, savvy investors think about breaking with conventional practices in favor of more creative alternatives. Bitcoin was first on the scene and has earned the most name recognition among cryptocurrencies. Still, it’s not the only altcoin out there. Bitcoin was the pioneer, but you can currently find more than 4,000 cryptocurrencies out there. Other crypto includes: Ethereum (ETH). Litecoin (LTC). Cardano (ADA). Chainlink (LINK). Dash. Monero (XMR). Polkadot (DOT). Bitcoin Cash (BCH). Binance Coin (BNB). Ripple (XPR). Stellar (XLM). Tether (USDT). Tron (TRX). While Bitcoin is a financial newbie compared to precious metals, cash, stocks, mutual funds, and IRAs, we can’t ignore its mainstream appeal. Still, some worry about the cryptocurrency’s staying power and its volatility. While Bitcoin is not likely to replace any of the traditional retirement options, you may consider adding it to your post-employment planning. With Bitcoin, you can diversify your portfolio and add some excitement to your retirement savings. What is a Bitcoin IRA? Bitcoin IRAs are individual retirement accounts that enable you to invest in Bitcoin or other types of cryptocurrency. These Bitcoin alternatives are known as altcoins. While the Internal Revenue Service does not back any particular accounts for crypto, the organization views Bitcoin as equivalent to stocks and bonds for tax purposes. The decision to treat bitcoins and altcoins as property means a custodian is necessary for regulatory compliance. Most IRA custodians focus on more traditional assets, such as stocks, bonds, money markets, and CDs. However, as Bitcoin enhances its mainstream popularity, you’ll see more companies taking on this specialized role. Bitcoin IRAs are self-directed IRAs (SD-IRAs). These SD-IRAs are gaining traction, though they require more of your personal attention than other investments might. They also require you to choose a custodian to maintain the account (I’ll get to that in a minute). In addition to investments in assets like real estate, gold, silver, and tax liens, SD-IRAs can hold crypto.   You probably won’t see crypto investment offerings from your employer’s retirement plan in the near future. Bitcoin has a reputation for volatility. Since retirement plan sponsors are responsible for liability surrounding their featured investments, they most likely won’t take the risk. Crypto boasts of decentralization. No government agency regulates it, but global governments are starting to take notice as popularity increases. Given that the IRS considers crypto similar to stocks or bonds, many financial professionals don’t classify altcoins and other cryptos as distinct types of assets. Industry pros may be fonder of blockchain technology and its lasting potential than of crypto as an asset. How do you start making Bitcoin part of your retirement strategy? Remember, Bitcoin might be part of your retirement investment strategy. You wouldn’t close all of your accounts to put everything you have into one stock, no matter how hot it seems to be (at least you shouldn’t). The same is true of Bitcoin. When Bitcoin is a portion of your diversified retirement portfolio, you can withstand short-term concerns about its volatility while waiting for long-term gains. When you’re ready to add Bitcoin, use a Bitcoin IRA. You can go it alone, which requires some crypto homework, or you can enlist the help of a pro. When you choose to DIY, be sure to pay close attention to Internal Revenue Service regulations. Though Bitcoin itself is decentralized, the IRS imposes limits, and it bans certain transactions. You’ll also create a self-directed IRA and a limited liability company (also known as an LLC) to serve as the organization for purchasing and selling Bitcoin for IRA purposes. The do-it-yourself route is trickier due to complex compliance issues and the higher risk of theft. This route requires in-depth crypto knowledge plus serious financial and investment chops. Aka, it's not recommended. On the other hand, if you go with a professional, you get the advantages of diversifying your portfolio with Bitcoin without as much hassle or homework. Think of it like ordering takeout from a great restaurant—you get to enjoy the meal without doing all the prep work. Bitcoin IRAs require special skills, even for professionals. These crypto retirement vehicles not only require extensive knowledge of cryptocurrency trading but also of enhanced data protection and management. How do you start your Bitcoin IRA journey? With the extra attention that these alternative assets require, traditional financial services or investment firms don’t offer a Bitcoin IRA option (yet). You’ll need to find a firm to help you get started. Just as you would with any investment, you should do some background research. Every firm has unique qualities and requirements, and you want one that matches your investment vibe. Some excellent sources for Bitcoin IRA custodians include: BitcoinIRA. BitcoinIRA is the most established in the Bitcoin IRA game. It’s secure and features easy account setup and use. You need to invest a minimum of $3,000 to start. BitIRA. BitIRA stores digital assets offline for heightened security, and it backs its protection with unlimited insurance. You need $5,000 to open your account. iTrustCapital. With low fees and minimum investments, iTrustCapital is great for Bitcoin IRA newcomers. The minimum account balance is $2,500. CoinIRA. CoinIRA excels at user experience, offering an educational guide to cryptocurrency IRAs and dedicated consultants to guide you through the process. The minimum starting balance is high at $20,000. Equity Trust. Equity Trust boasts nearly 40 years of experience with self-directed IRAs, and now it offers crypto IRAs as well. The low starting balance of $500 makes it an attractive option for beginners. Alto. Alto features a variety of alternative investment options, including several types of crypto. With no minimum balance to start, no setup fees, and no extra exchange fees, it’s a good place to dabble. IRA Financial Trust. IRA Financial Trust touts a reputation built on user choice and minimal costs. It doesn’t require a minimum balance; plus, it gives you the power to choose your own crypto exchange. It’s perfect if you know about crypto but haven’t built a financial empire yet. Each of these sites offers Bitcoin, as well as other crypto trading and investment options. Each has different minimum account requirements and different fees. They all offer 24/7 access, crypto knowledge, and reliable reputations in this specialized space for alternative assets. Do a little online homework to see if one speaks to you and meets your crypto IRA needs. What are some advantages of a Bitcoin IRA? In the investment world, there are no absolutes. No investment type is all good or all bad. Each comes with advantages and disadvantages. Bitcoin IRAs are no exception. Benefits of adding this investment vehicle to your retirement planning include the following. Going global When you have Bitcoin, you hold global currency. The crypto is recognizable worldwide and works in the same manner wherever you may be. Growing potential Right now, Bitcoin and crypto have plenty of room to grow. Since Bitcoin hit the scene, it’s been on an upward trend surpassing other markets. If value accelerates rapidly, your Bitcoin IRA may have a positive impact on your retirement funds. Since your retirement is far off on the horizon, you can play the waiting game. Diversifying your portfolio A solid investment strategy relies on diversifying your retirement portfolio even if you’re sticking with more traditional types of investments. Diversity is even more crucial when you talk about alternative assets like Bitcoin or other forms of crypto. Adding a Bitcoin IRA brings fresh excitement to your portfolio and adds a layer of protection to your retirement savings in case of a drastic market downturn or financial upheaval that causes distress with traditional market products. Looking to the future Fans of Bitcoin IRAs believe playing the long game is worth it, which means putting their faith in crypto’s mainstream and financial growth. If you have four decades until retirement, you may be more willing to gamble with this part of your portfolio and put your money on altcoin’s future potential. Of course, nay-sayers continue to point out crypto’s instability and volatility.  Saving on taxes Using Bitcoin to invest in specific kinds of accounts may give you the power to steer clear of steep capital gains taxes, though you may still face other fees. When you have crypto as a regular taxable investment, capital gains tax will impact your purchase and sale transactions. When you use the tax shield of diversifying your assets and putting Bitcoin in a self-directed IRA coupled with a crypto wallet, you can lessen your tax burden. Whether you settle up with the IRS now or in the future depends on your choice of a Roth IRA or a traditional IRA. With Roth IRAs, you pay taxes at the start and your gains are tax-free. With traditional IRAs, you pay Uncle Sam when you withdraw the funds. Do Bitcoin IRAs have any drawbacks? Nothing’s perfect—though a great burger and fries come close. Of course, Bitcoin IRAs have some downsides: Doubling up When you choose a Bitcoin IRA, you will need a separate retirement account for your traditional investments. Just as conventional funds cannot handle Bitcoin, crypto custodians don’t manage stocks and bonds. To ensure a diverse portfolio, you’ll have to open and maintain at least two retirement accounts with different servicers for each of these asset classes. Navigating uncertainty Though Bitcoin’s popularity continues to rise, most experts still see crypto as a speculative investment subject to volatility and drastic value fluctuations. With thousands of cryptocurrency choices available, you can’t say for sure which will last and which will disappear unless you have magical powers. Some experts predict an overall crypto crash, while others foresee massive growth. Unless you have magical powers, you don’t know what the future will bring. If you discuss your concerns with a professional, you can choose a fund composed of a variety of crypto to alleviate some of the uncertainty. Lacking value metrics Unlike stocks, with crypto, you don’t have any share of corporate ownership backed by company earnings. Bitcoin and other altcoins have value in pricing that changes daily. Meeting the minimum Compared to more traditional IRAs, Bitcoin IRAs may require significant minimum investments. An online search of the different custodians will allow you to compare minimum investments to find one that works for you. Paying a price You may pay higher fees for a self-directed IRA. By comparing providers, you can find one with fees that suit your budget and comfort level. Don’t let the high costs at one company price you out of the game.  Limiting your options Certain custodians limit your power and choice, only giving you the option of trading on affiliated currency exchanges. Others allow more leeway and let you choose according to preference. If you’re in the know and desire a specific crypto exchange, check to see if your Bitcoin IRA custodian will give you that option. Counting your losses You already know the good news when it comes to Bitcoin IRA tax advantages. Ready for the bad news? With traditional investment accounts, if you suffer a capital loss, you recoup by deducting those losses or balancing out other gains. This type of recovery isn’t possible with Bitcoin IRAs because of their existing tax benefits. Keeping tabs Though the companies I mentioned above are custodians of your Bitcoin IRA, keep in mind that they’re still new and may not provide as much oversight as traditional brokers, advisors, or financial service firms do. The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) does not have any powers to supervise Bitcoin custodians. Remember, decentralization is in Bitcoin’s DNA. While these firms should have your best financial interests at heart, they do not have requirements to operate under the same fiduciary regulations as the more traditional players. Summary None of us knows what the future holds, but what’s life without a bit of risk? If you want to create some diversity and adventure in your retirement savings, now’s the time—especially if you have several decades before you get to cut the cake at your retirement celebration. Bitcoin IRAs may offer huge rewards, but they come with higher-than-normal risks. If you want to dabble in Bitcoin IRAs while mitigating potential losses, your best bet is to make sure that these alternative investments represent 10% or less of your retirement portfolio. Read more: Investing In Bitcoin: Everything You Need To Know Before You Buy The Top 10 Things You Need To Know About Bitcoin - Macrame goods

Macrame is another current trend, so you can charge a pretty penny for these handmade goods. Additionally, a macrame cord or rope is the only essential material you’ll need to get started, so this craft can be inexpensive to create.

Once you’ve mastered some basic knots, there are a number of products you could make, including plant hangers, wall decor, coasters, keychains, and even petite little earrings. The size of your project will dictate the width and length of cord or rope you purchase, but there are plenty of $10 spools from Amazon that are great for beginners.

5. Dog collars

It’s easy to find a basic red or blue collar at your local Walmart, but some of us want a little extra “bling” for our furry friends. With a few simple materials, you can create colorful accessories for your pet and plenty of others.

After you’ve selected some fabric and thread, you’ll need to order some specific supplies in bulk, like buckles, D-rings, and tri-glide clips. You’ll also need a heavy-duty sewing machine for this project, as collars will require sewing several layers of fabric together.

Fortunately, there are plenty of pet lovers who are happy to fork out the cash to dress up their pets. 

6. Children’s toys

If you’re a parent or have friends with young children, consider crocheting or sewing unique toys for kids.

There are plenty of toys you can create from a simple set of supplies, like felt play food or even crocheted hatching dinosaurs (seriously, Google them, they’re adorable). You can even make toys with materials you have lying around the house!

To keep costs down, start by recycling fabrics for materials. If you’d like to try your hand at crochet, expect an initial investment of $10-$30, then roughly $5 per roll of yarn, then price your masterpieces using the balanced method, from Crochetpreneur.

7. Fridge magnets

At your age, retirement probably feels like a long way off. You’re just planning your meteoric rise up the corporate ladder.  While you don’t need to make out the guestlist for your party just yet, it’s not too soon to start thinking about retirement. You might even consider how to invest in your retirement using Bitcoin. Bitcoin? Retirement? Really?  Technology has powered rapid changes in our lives. Internet searches replaced encyclopedias. Smartphones replaced landlines. Netflix replaced Blockbuster.  Bitcoin isn’t sending traditional savings into retirement right now, but it’s worth investigating as part of your long-term financial planning. A Bitcoin refresher Just as the internet, smartphones, and Netflix enhanced our access to knowledge, communication, and movies, technology has opened the doors to a variety of different individual investments, including IRAs. Bitcoin first went public in 2009, when its enigmatic creator, Satoshi Nakamoto, shared the idea behind it. Featuring peer-to-peer online trading and a decentralized nature, Bitcoin grabbed the attention of tech-savvy people tired of traditional finance and banking. Bitcoin has plenty of fans who view the cryptocurrency as an ideal alternative to traditional cash or precious metal coins. Unlike other forms of wealth, Bitcoin doesn’t originate from, nor is it controlled by, any banking organization or government entity. Users can buy Bitcoin using fiat currency and store it in their Bitcoin wallets. In the cryptocurrency’s early days, individuals could mine bitcoins via computer algorithms, but these days buying is your best option. With Bitcoin, network processing joined via a common ledger has replaced the centralized control of a banking system. Any transaction gets recorded to a blockchain, which gets distributed to all user accounts. Bitcoin doesn’t need one gatekeeper because everyone with an account has access to oversight. You can use bitcoins to pay for various purchases, including food, travel, video games, music, and even charitable donations. You can’t walk into your favorite local spot and put some bitcoin down on the bar, but you can make online payments by sending a portion of your bitcoins to the seller’s address. Bitcoin also has a growing fan base in unbanked or underbanked areas, bringing added virtual financial services to locations where they’re desperately needed. You shouldn’t cut up all your credit cards in favor of Bitcoin just yet, though. But as Bitcoin gains popularity and shines as the gold standard of cryptocurrency, some investors want to make it part of their retirement portfolio. Some basics on investing for your retirement Before I jump into Bitcoin-funded retirement, let’s talk about traditional retirement wisdom and options. First up: when should you start saving for retirement? That’s an easy one. NOW. If you’re nearing the big 3-0, start now. If you’re in your 20s, start now. If you’re in your 40s, start yesterday. Since time travel isn’t possible, start — you guessed it — now. According to research from the Federal Reserve, 25% of people have nothing saved for retirement. That’s millions of people with no financial safety net other than Social Security.  You’re going to have a really tough time celebrating your retirement if you have no way to pay your bills. When you can’t even cover the basics, kicking back and enjoying your days without a desk or a boss will be next to impossible. That’s not who you want to be when you grow up. If you start saving for retirement at 25, you should have one to one-and-a-half times your salary socked away by the time you hit your mid-thirties. Are you on track to meet those guideposts? Great. If you don’t, you shouldn’t beat yourself up. You SHOULD start your retirement savings right away. What are some traditional retirement savings options? Traditional retirement savings options include: 401(k). An employer-connected account you build via pre-tax deductions from your paycheck. 403(b). Like a 401(k) for people who work for a non-profit organization or educational institution. IRA. Stands for Individual Retirement Account. They're not connected to your job, IRAs are open to everyone. You may find tax-deductible traditional IRAs, post-tax Roth IRAs, or SEP IRAs for anyone self-employed.  Bitcoin breaks with tradition The investment market tends to hold fast to tradition, though during uncertain economic times, savvy investors think about breaking with conventional practices in favor of more creative alternatives. Bitcoin was first on the scene and has earned the most name recognition among cryptocurrencies. Still, it’s not the only altcoin out there. Bitcoin was the pioneer, but you can currently find more than 4,000 cryptocurrencies out there. Other crypto includes: Ethereum (ETH). Litecoin (LTC). Cardano (ADA). Chainlink (LINK). Dash. Monero (XMR). Polkadot (DOT). Bitcoin Cash (BCH). Binance Coin (BNB). Ripple (XPR). Stellar (XLM). Tether (USDT). Tron (TRX). While Bitcoin is a financial newbie compared to precious metals, cash, stocks, mutual funds, and IRAs, we can’t ignore its mainstream appeal. Still, some worry about the cryptocurrency’s staying power and its volatility. While Bitcoin is not likely to replace any of the traditional retirement options, you may consider adding it to your post-employment planning. With Bitcoin, you can diversify your portfolio and add some excitement to your retirement savings. What is a Bitcoin IRA? Bitcoin IRAs are individual retirement accounts that enable you to invest in Bitcoin or other types of cryptocurrency. These Bitcoin alternatives are known as altcoins. While the Internal Revenue Service does not back any particular accounts for crypto, the organization views Bitcoin as equivalent to stocks and bonds for tax purposes. The decision to treat bitcoins and altcoins as property means a custodian is necessary for regulatory compliance. Most IRA custodians focus on more traditional assets, such as stocks, bonds, money markets, and CDs. However, as Bitcoin enhances its mainstream popularity, you’ll see more companies taking on this specialized role. Bitcoin IRAs are self-directed IRAs (SD-IRAs). These SD-IRAs are gaining traction, though they require more of your personal attention than other investments might. They also require you to choose a custodian to maintain the account (I’ll get to that in a minute). In addition to investments in assets like real estate, gold, silver, and tax liens, SD-IRAs can hold crypto.   You probably won’t see crypto investment offerings from your employer’s retirement plan in the near future. Bitcoin has a reputation for volatility. Since retirement plan sponsors are responsible for liability surrounding their featured investments, they most likely won’t take the risk. Crypto boasts of decentralization. No government agency regulates it, but global governments are starting to take notice as popularity increases. Given that the IRS considers crypto similar to stocks or bonds, many financial professionals don’t classify altcoins and other cryptos as distinct types of assets. Industry pros may be fonder of blockchain technology and its lasting potential than of crypto as an asset. How do you start making Bitcoin part of your retirement strategy? Remember, Bitcoin might be part of your retirement investment strategy. You wouldn’t close all of your accounts to put everything you have into one stock, no matter how hot it seems to be (at least you shouldn’t). The same is true of Bitcoin. When Bitcoin is a portion of your diversified retirement portfolio, you can withstand short-term concerns about its volatility while waiting for long-term gains. When you’re ready to add Bitcoin, use a Bitcoin IRA. You can go it alone, which requires some crypto homework, or you can enlist the help of a pro. When you choose to DIY, be sure to pay close attention to Internal Revenue Service regulations. Though Bitcoin itself is decentralized, the IRS imposes limits, and it bans certain transactions. You’ll also create a self-directed IRA and a limited liability company (also known as an LLC) to serve as the organization for purchasing and selling Bitcoin for IRA purposes. The do-it-yourself route is trickier due to complex compliance issues and the higher risk of theft. This route requires in-depth crypto knowledge plus serious financial and investment chops. Aka, it's not recommended. On the other hand, if you go with a professional, you get the advantages of diversifying your portfolio with Bitcoin without as much hassle or homework. Think of it like ordering takeout from a great restaurant—you get to enjoy the meal without doing all the prep work. Bitcoin IRAs require special skills, even for professionals. These crypto retirement vehicles not only require extensive knowledge of cryptocurrency trading but also of enhanced data protection and management. How do you start your Bitcoin IRA journey? With the extra attention that these alternative assets require, traditional financial services or investment firms don’t offer a Bitcoin IRA option (yet). You’ll need to find a firm to help you get started. Just as you would with any investment, you should do some background research. Every firm has unique qualities and requirements, and you want one that matches your investment vibe. Some excellent sources for Bitcoin IRA custodians include: BitcoinIRA. BitcoinIRA is the most established in the Bitcoin IRA game. It’s secure and features easy account setup and use. You need to invest a minimum of $3,000 to start. BitIRA. BitIRA stores digital assets offline for heightened security, and it backs its protection with unlimited insurance. You need $5,000 to open your account. iTrustCapital. With low fees and minimum investments, iTrustCapital is great for Bitcoin IRA newcomers. The minimum account balance is $2,500. CoinIRA. CoinIRA excels at user experience, offering an educational guide to cryptocurrency IRAs and dedicated consultants to guide you through the process. The minimum starting balance is high at $20,000. Equity Trust. Equity Trust boasts nearly 40 years of experience with self-directed IRAs, and now it offers crypto IRAs as well. The low starting balance of $500 makes it an attractive option for beginners. Alto. Alto features a variety of alternative investment options, including several types of crypto. With no minimum balance to start, no setup fees, and no extra exchange fees, it’s a good place to dabble. IRA Financial Trust. IRA Financial Trust touts a reputation built on user choice and minimal costs. It doesn’t require a minimum balance; plus, it gives you the power to choose your own crypto exchange. It’s perfect if you know about crypto but haven’t built a financial empire yet. Each of these sites offers Bitcoin, as well as other crypto trading and investment options. Each has different minimum account requirements and different fees. They all offer 24/7 access, crypto knowledge, and reliable reputations in this specialized space for alternative assets. Do a little online homework to see if one speaks to you and meets your crypto IRA needs. What are some advantages of a Bitcoin IRA? In the investment world, there are no absolutes. No investment type is all good or all bad. Each comes with advantages and disadvantages. Bitcoin IRAs are no exception. Benefits of adding this investment vehicle to your retirement planning include the following. Going global When you have Bitcoin, you hold global currency. The crypto is recognizable worldwide and works in the same manner wherever you may be. Growing potential Right now, Bitcoin and crypto have plenty of room to grow. Since Bitcoin hit the scene, it’s been on an upward trend surpassing other markets. If value accelerates rapidly, your Bitcoin IRA may have a positive impact on your retirement funds. Since your retirement is far off on the horizon, you can play the waiting game. Diversifying your portfolio A solid investment strategy relies on diversifying your retirement portfolio even if you’re sticking with more traditional types of investments. Diversity is even more crucial when you talk about alternative assets like Bitcoin or other forms of crypto. Adding a Bitcoin IRA brings fresh excitement to your portfolio and adds a layer of protection to your retirement savings in case of a drastic market downturn or financial upheaval that causes distress with traditional market products. Looking to the future Fans of Bitcoin IRAs believe playing the long game is worth it, which means putting their faith in crypto’s mainstream and financial growth. If you have four decades until retirement, you may be more willing to gamble with this part of your portfolio and put your money on altcoin’s future potential. Of course, nay-sayers continue to point out crypto’s instability and volatility.  Saving on taxes Using Bitcoin to invest in specific kinds of accounts may give you the power to steer clear of steep capital gains taxes, though you may still face other fees. When you have crypto as a regular taxable investment, capital gains tax will impact your purchase and sale transactions. When you use the tax shield of diversifying your assets and putting Bitcoin in a self-directed IRA coupled with a crypto wallet, you can lessen your tax burden. Whether you settle up with the IRS now or in the future depends on your choice of a Roth IRA or a traditional IRA. With Roth IRAs, you pay taxes at the start and your gains are tax-free. With traditional IRAs, you pay Uncle Sam when you withdraw the funds. Do Bitcoin IRAs have any drawbacks? Nothing’s perfect—though a great burger and fries come close. Of course, Bitcoin IRAs have some downsides: Doubling up When you choose a Bitcoin IRA, you will need a separate retirement account for your traditional investments. Just as conventional funds cannot handle Bitcoin, crypto custodians don’t manage stocks and bonds. To ensure a diverse portfolio, you’ll have to open and maintain at least two retirement accounts with different servicers for each of these asset classes. Navigating uncertainty Though Bitcoin’s popularity continues to rise, most experts still see crypto as a speculative investment subject to volatility and drastic value fluctuations. With thousands of cryptocurrency choices available, you can’t say for sure which will last and which will disappear unless you have magical powers. Some experts predict an overall crypto crash, while others foresee massive growth. Unless you have magical powers, you don’t know what the future will bring. If you discuss your concerns with a professional, you can choose a fund composed of a variety of crypto to alleviate some of the uncertainty. Lacking value metrics Unlike stocks, with crypto, you don’t have any share of corporate ownership backed by company earnings. Bitcoin and other altcoins have value in pricing that changes daily. Meeting the minimum Compared to more traditional IRAs, Bitcoin IRAs may require significant minimum investments. An online search of the different custodians will allow you to compare minimum investments to find one that works for you. Paying a price You may pay higher fees for a self-directed IRA. By comparing providers, you can find one with fees that suit your budget and comfort level. Don’t let the high costs at one company price you out of the game.  Limiting your options Certain custodians limit your power and choice, only giving you the option of trading on affiliated currency exchanges. Others allow more leeway and let you choose according to preference. If you’re in the know and desire a specific crypto exchange, check to see if your Bitcoin IRA custodian will give you that option. Counting your losses You already know the good news when it comes to Bitcoin IRA tax advantages. Ready for the bad news? With traditional investment accounts, if you suffer a capital loss, you recoup by deducting those losses or balancing out other gains. This type of recovery isn’t possible with Bitcoin IRAs because of their existing tax benefits. Keeping tabs Though the companies I mentioned above are custodians of your Bitcoin IRA, keep in mind that they’re still new and may not provide as much oversight as traditional brokers, advisors, or financial service firms do. The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) does not have any powers to supervise Bitcoin custodians. Remember, decentralization is in Bitcoin’s DNA. While these firms should have your best financial interests at heart, they do not have requirements to operate under the same fiduciary regulations as the more traditional players. Summary None of us knows what the future holds, but what’s life without a bit of risk? If you want to create some diversity and adventure in your retirement savings, now’s the time—especially if you have several decades before you get to cut the cake at your retirement celebration. Bitcoin IRAs may offer huge rewards, but they come with higher-than-normal risks. If you want to dabble in Bitcoin IRAs while mitigating potential losses, your best bet is to make sure that these alternative investments represent 10% or less of your retirement portfolio. Read more: Investing In Bitcoin: Everything You Need To Know Before You Buy The Top 10 Things You Need To Know About Bitcoin - Fridge magnets

Of all the crafts in this list, magnets are arguably the simplest.

All you need are (of course) magnets, a hot glue gun and glue sticks, and something fridge-worthy to feature. Plenty of simple tutorials from HGTV can show you how to make various different magnets. However, there are a number of cute and creative items you can showcase using magnets, like these tiny vase magnets for $56!

You can order a pack of 120 magnets for just $10.99 on Amazon and a basic glue gun with glue sticks for a dollar more. That’s a pretty cheap investment, and depending on how clever your idea is, you can charge $10, $20, or even $50 for a small set of fridge magnets!

8. Artwork

Whether you prefer acrylic paintings, watercolor, or simple black and white sketches, selling your one-of-a-kind artwork is another excellent means of making money off your creative endeavors.

One reason artwork is such a great craft to sell is because you can sell it digitally. Create one unique and popular design and sell the same printable piece over and over again! You can even develop downloadable designs to use as wallpaper backgrounds for laptops and cell phones.

Typically, digital artwork sells for just a few dollars per piece, but this is a great money-maker for those who have little spare time and want a product they can leave on auto-pilot.

9. Hair accessories

If sewing kids’ toys caught your attention, hair accessories may be another ideal money-maker for you.

The beauty of hair accessories is there are so many different fabrics you can utilize for these products, making your exclusive designs even more attractive. There are plenty of easy tutorials online for scrunchies, headbands, and such; and you can recycle old clothes and fabrics for this project too.

If you don’t already own a sewing machine, expect to pay $100 or more for a new sewing machine. Or, try your local thrift store for a cheaper, entry-level option. My husband and I purchased ours secondhand from Goodwill for around $20.

Despite the potentially pricey cost up-front, the materials for this craft are quite inexpensive. One scrunchie costs roughly $1 for materials and sells for $3-$5.

10. Candles

At your age, retirement probably feels like a long way off. You’re just planning your meteoric rise up the corporate ladder.  While you don’t need to make out the guestlist for your party just yet, it’s not too soon to start thinking about retirement. You might even consider how to invest in your retirement using Bitcoin. Bitcoin? Retirement? Really?  Technology has powered rapid changes in our lives. Internet searches replaced encyclopedias. Smartphones replaced landlines. Netflix replaced Blockbuster.  Bitcoin isn’t sending traditional savings into retirement right now, but it’s worth investigating as part of your long-term financial planning. A Bitcoin refresher Just as the internet, smartphones, and Netflix enhanced our access to knowledge, communication, and movies, technology has opened the doors to a variety of different individual investments, including IRAs. Bitcoin first went public in 2009, when its enigmatic creator, Satoshi Nakamoto, shared the idea behind it. Featuring peer-to-peer online trading and a decentralized nature, Bitcoin grabbed the attention of tech-savvy people tired of traditional finance and banking. Bitcoin has plenty of fans who view the cryptocurrency as an ideal alternative to traditional cash or precious metal coins. Unlike other forms of wealth, Bitcoin doesn’t originate from, nor is it controlled by, any banking organization or government entity. Users can buy Bitcoin using fiat currency and store it in their Bitcoin wallets. In the cryptocurrency’s early days, individuals could mine bitcoins via computer algorithms, but these days buying is your best option. With Bitcoin, network processing joined via a common ledger has replaced the centralized control of a banking system. Any transaction gets recorded to a blockchain, which gets distributed to all user accounts. Bitcoin doesn’t need one gatekeeper because everyone with an account has access to oversight. You can use bitcoins to pay for various purchases, including food, travel, video games, music, and even charitable donations. You can’t walk into your favorite local spot and put some bitcoin down on the bar, but you can make online payments by sending a portion of your bitcoins to the seller’s address. Bitcoin also has a growing fan base in unbanked or underbanked areas, bringing added virtual financial services to locations where they’re desperately needed. You shouldn’t cut up all your credit cards in favor of Bitcoin just yet, though. But as Bitcoin gains popularity and shines as the gold standard of cryptocurrency, some investors want to make it part of their retirement portfolio. Some basics on investing for your retirement Before I jump into Bitcoin-funded retirement, let’s talk about traditional retirement wisdom and options. First up: when should you start saving for retirement? That’s an easy one. NOW. If you’re nearing the big 3-0, start now. If you’re in your 20s, start now. If you’re in your 40s, start yesterday. Since time travel isn’t possible, start — you guessed it — now. According to research from the Federal Reserve, 25% of people have nothing saved for retirement. That’s millions of people with no financial safety net other than Social Security.  You’re going to have a really tough time celebrating your retirement if you have no way to pay your bills. When you can’t even cover the basics, kicking back and enjoying your days without a desk or a boss will be next to impossible. That’s not who you want to be when you grow up. If you start saving for retirement at 25, you should have one to one-and-a-half times your salary socked away by the time you hit your mid-thirties. Are you on track to meet those guideposts? Great. If you don’t, you shouldn’t beat yourself up. You SHOULD start your retirement savings right away. What are some traditional retirement savings options? Traditional retirement savings options include: 401(k). An employer-connected account you build via pre-tax deductions from your paycheck. 403(b). Like a 401(k) for people who work for a non-profit organization or educational institution. IRA. Stands for Individual Retirement Account. They're not connected to your job, IRAs are open to everyone. You may find tax-deductible traditional IRAs, post-tax Roth IRAs, or SEP IRAs for anyone self-employed.  Bitcoin breaks with tradition The investment market tends to hold fast to tradition, though during uncertain economic times, savvy investors think about breaking with conventional practices in favor of more creative alternatives. Bitcoin was first on the scene and has earned the most name recognition among cryptocurrencies. Still, it’s not the only altcoin out there. Bitcoin was the pioneer, but you can currently find more than 4,000 cryptocurrencies out there. Other crypto includes: Ethereum (ETH). Litecoin (LTC). Cardano (ADA). Chainlink (LINK). Dash. Monero (XMR). Polkadot (DOT). Bitcoin Cash (BCH). Binance Coin (BNB). Ripple (XPR). Stellar (XLM). Tether (USDT). Tron (TRX). While Bitcoin is a financial newbie compared to precious metals, cash, stocks, mutual funds, and IRAs, we can’t ignore its mainstream appeal. Still, some worry about the cryptocurrency’s staying power and its volatility. While Bitcoin is not likely to replace any of the traditional retirement options, you may consider adding it to your post-employment planning. With Bitcoin, you can diversify your portfolio and add some excitement to your retirement savings. What is a Bitcoin IRA? Bitcoin IRAs are individual retirement accounts that enable you to invest in Bitcoin or other types of cryptocurrency. These Bitcoin alternatives are known as altcoins. While the Internal Revenue Service does not back any particular accounts for crypto, the organization views Bitcoin as equivalent to stocks and bonds for tax purposes. The decision to treat bitcoins and altcoins as property means a custodian is necessary for regulatory compliance. Most IRA custodians focus on more traditional assets, such as stocks, bonds, money markets, and CDs. However, as Bitcoin enhances its mainstream popularity, you’ll see more companies taking on this specialized role. Bitcoin IRAs are self-directed IRAs (SD-IRAs). These SD-IRAs are gaining traction, though they require more of your personal attention than other investments might. They also require you to choose a custodian to maintain the account (I’ll get to that in a minute). In addition to investments in assets like real estate, gold, silver, and tax liens, SD-IRAs can hold crypto.   You probably won’t see crypto investment offerings from your employer’s retirement plan in the near future. Bitcoin has a reputation for volatility. Since retirement plan sponsors are responsible for liability surrounding their featured investments, they most likely won’t take the risk. Crypto boasts of decentralization. No government agency regulates it, but global governments are starting to take notice as popularity increases. Given that the IRS considers crypto similar to stocks or bonds, many financial professionals don’t classify altcoins and other cryptos as distinct types of assets. Industry pros may be fonder of blockchain technology and its lasting potential than of crypto as an asset. How do you start making Bitcoin part of your retirement strategy? Remember, Bitcoin might be part of your retirement investment strategy. You wouldn’t close all of your accounts to put everything you have into one stock, no matter how hot it seems to be (at least you shouldn’t). The same is true of Bitcoin. When Bitcoin is a portion of your diversified retirement portfolio, you can withstand short-term concerns about its volatility while waiting for long-term gains. When you’re ready to add Bitcoin, use a Bitcoin IRA. You can go it alone, which requires some crypto homework, or you can enlist the help of a pro. When you choose to DIY, be sure to pay close attention to Internal Revenue Service regulations. Though Bitcoin itself is decentralized, the IRS imposes limits, and it bans certain transactions. You’ll also create a self-directed IRA and a limited liability company (also known as an LLC) to serve as the organization for purchasing and selling Bitcoin for IRA purposes. The do-it-yourself route is trickier due to complex compliance issues and the higher risk of theft. This route requires in-depth crypto knowledge plus serious financial and investment chops. Aka, it's not recommended. On the other hand, if you go with a professional, you get the advantages of diversifying your portfolio with Bitcoin without as much hassle or homework. Think of it like ordering takeout from a great restaurant—you get to enjoy the meal without doing all the prep work. Bitcoin IRAs require special skills, even for professionals. These crypto retirement vehicles not only require extensive knowledge of cryptocurrency trading but also of enhanced data protection and management. How do you start your Bitcoin IRA journey? With the extra attention that these alternative assets require, traditional financial services or investment firms don’t offer a Bitcoin IRA option (yet). You’ll need to find a firm to help you get started. Just as you would with any investment, you should do some background research. Every firm has unique qualities and requirements, and you want one that matches your investment vibe. Some excellent sources for Bitcoin IRA custodians include: BitcoinIRA. BitcoinIRA is the most established in the Bitcoin IRA game. It’s secure and features easy account setup and use. You need to invest a minimum of $3,000 to start. BitIRA. BitIRA stores digital assets offline for heightened security, and it backs its protection with unlimited insurance. You need $5,000 to open your account. iTrustCapital. With low fees and minimum investments, iTrustCapital is great for Bitcoin IRA newcomers. The minimum account balance is $2,500. CoinIRA. CoinIRA excels at user experience, offering an educational guide to cryptocurrency IRAs and dedicated consultants to guide you through the process. The minimum starting balance is high at $20,000. Equity Trust. Equity Trust boasts nearly 40 years of experience with self-directed IRAs, and now it offers crypto IRAs as well. The low starting balance of $500 makes it an attractive option for beginners. Alto. Alto features a variety of alternative investment options, including several types of crypto. With no minimum balance to start, no setup fees, and no extra exchange fees, it’s a good place to dabble. IRA Financial Trust. IRA Financial Trust touts a reputation built on user choice and minimal costs. It doesn’t require a minimum balance; plus, it gives you the power to choose your own crypto exchange. It’s perfect if you know about crypto but haven’t built a financial empire yet. Each of these sites offers Bitcoin, as well as other crypto trading and investment options. Each has different minimum account requirements and different fees. They all offer 24/7 access, crypto knowledge, and reliable reputations in this specialized space for alternative assets. Do a little online homework to see if one speaks to you and meets your crypto IRA needs. What are some advantages of a Bitcoin IRA? In the investment world, there are no absolutes. No investment type is all good or all bad. Each comes with advantages and disadvantages. Bitcoin IRAs are no exception. Benefits of adding this investment vehicle to your retirement planning include the following. Going global When you have Bitcoin, you hold global currency. The crypto is recognizable worldwide and works in the same manner wherever you may be. Growing potential Right now, Bitcoin and crypto have plenty of room to grow. Since Bitcoin hit the scene, it’s been on an upward trend surpassing other markets. If value accelerates rapidly, your Bitcoin IRA may have a positive impact on your retirement funds. Since your retirement is far off on the horizon, you can play the waiting game. Diversifying your portfolio A solid investment strategy relies on diversifying your retirement portfolio even if you’re sticking with more traditional types of investments. Diversity is even more crucial when you talk about alternative assets like Bitcoin or other forms of crypto. Adding a Bitcoin IRA brings fresh excitement to your portfolio and adds a layer of protection to your retirement savings in case of a drastic market downturn or financial upheaval that causes distress with traditional market products. Looking to the future Fans of Bitcoin IRAs believe playing the long game is worth it, which means putting their faith in crypto’s mainstream and financial growth. If you have four decades until retirement, you may be more willing to gamble with this part of your portfolio and put your money on altcoin’s future potential. Of course, nay-sayers continue to point out crypto’s instability and volatility.  Saving on taxes Using Bitcoin to invest in specific kinds of accounts may give you the power to steer clear of steep capital gains taxes, though you may still face other fees. When you have crypto as a regular taxable investment, capital gains tax will impact your purchase and sale transactions. When you use the tax shield of diversifying your assets and putting Bitcoin in a self-directed IRA coupled with a crypto wallet, you can lessen your tax burden. Whether you settle up with the IRS now or in the future depends on your choice of a Roth IRA or a traditional IRA. With Roth IRAs, you pay taxes at the start and your gains are tax-free. With traditional IRAs, you pay Uncle Sam when you withdraw the funds. Do Bitcoin IRAs have any drawbacks? Nothing’s perfect—though a great burger and fries come close. Of course, Bitcoin IRAs have some downsides: Doubling up When you choose a Bitcoin IRA, you will need a separate retirement account for your traditional investments. Just as conventional funds cannot handle Bitcoin, crypto custodians don’t manage stocks and bonds. To ensure a diverse portfolio, you’ll have to open and maintain at least two retirement accounts with different servicers for each of these asset classes. Navigating uncertainty Though Bitcoin’s popularity continues to rise, most experts still see crypto as a speculative investment subject to volatility and drastic value fluctuations. With thousands of cryptocurrency choices available, you can’t say for sure which will last and which will disappear unless you have magical powers. Some experts predict an overall crypto crash, while others foresee massive growth. Unless you have magical powers, you don’t know what the future will bring. If you discuss your concerns with a professional, you can choose a fund composed of a variety of crypto to alleviate some of the uncertainty. Lacking value metrics Unlike stocks, with crypto, you don’t have any share of corporate ownership backed by company earnings. Bitcoin and other altcoins have value in pricing that changes daily. Meeting the minimum Compared to more traditional IRAs, Bitcoin IRAs may require significant minimum investments. An online search of the different custodians will allow you to compare minimum investments to find one that works for you. Paying a price You may pay higher fees for a self-directed IRA. By comparing providers, you can find one with fees that suit your budget and comfort level. Don’t let the high costs at one company price you out of the game.  Limiting your options Certain custodians limit your power and choice, only giving you the option of trading on affiliated currency exchanges. Others allow more leeway and let you choose according to preference. If you’re in the know and desire a specific crypto exchange, check to see if your Bitcoin IRA custodian will give you that option. Counting your losses You already know the good news when it comes to Bitcoin IRA tax advantages. Ready for the bad news? With traditional investment accounts, if you suffer a capital loss, you recoup by deducting those losses or balancing out other gains. This type of recovery isn’t possible with Bitcoin IRAs because of their existing tax benefits. Keeping tabs Though the companies I mentioned above are custodians of your Bitcoin IRA, keep in mind that they’re still new and may not provide as much oversight as traditional brokers, advisors, or financial service firms do. The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) does not have any powers to supervise Bitcoin custodians. Remember, decentralization is in Bitcoin’s DNA. While these firms should have your best financial interests at heart, they do not have requirements to operate under the same fiduciary regulations as the more traditional players. Summary None of us knows what the future holds, but what’s life without a bit of risk? If you want to create some diversity and adventure in your retirement savings, now’s the time—especially if you have several decades before you get to cut the cake at your retirement celebration. Bitcoin IRAs may offer huge rewards, but they come with higher-than-normal risks. If you want to dabble in Bitcoin IRAs while mitigating potential losses, your best bet is to make sure that these alternative investments represent 10% or less of your retirement portfolio. Read more: Investing In Bitcoin: Everything You Need To Know Before You Buy The Top 10 Things You Need To Know About Bitcoin - Candles

As pricey as they are, candles are extremely easy to make. They feature a variety of colors and scents, fun vessels like mason jars and tins, and sometimes even dried herbs and flowers in the wax.

On Etsy, most candles are priced between $10 and $25, and they typically cost just $3-$4 each to make and ship, according to Candle Science. But, add a creative twist to your product to help it stand out. You can also charge a little more than your competitors if your product has a one-of-a-kind design.

For instance, a popular store on Etsy, Get A Whiff Co sells their candles for $23.99 or $31.99, depending on the size. 

11. Concrete planters

If you’re a green thumb like me, you’ll love this DIY product.

Concrete planters can be made in a number of unique shapes, sizes, and, yes, even colors! As if those perks weren’t enough to pique your interest, concrete planters are CHEAP! You can purchase a 60-pound bag of concrete from Home Depot for just $3 and sell a single planter for five times that! 

Here is an easy tutorial for large planters you can create with a five-gallon bucket.

12. Resin coasters

Resin is another excellent tool for crafting enthusiasts. You can use resin to create anything from bookmarks to hair clips, but one super simple item to make with this material is coasters.

Resin coasters require a simple, circular mold, and you can use a number of decorative materials to spice up the design. Dried flowers and herbs, for example, make for a gorgeous and inexpensive addition to your coasters. Or, think up a design that’s outside the box to set your product apart. 

Start with a clear polyester casting or epoxy resin (which you can get on Amazon for around $50). In addition to the resin, you’ll need a few extra tools, including protective gear (gloves and goggles), a nonstick work surface, and measuring cups and stir sticks.

13. Clay earrings

At your age, retirement probably feels like a long way off. You’re just planning your meteoric rise up the corporate ladder.  While you don’t need to make out the guestlist for your party just yet, it’s not too soon to start thinking about retirement. You might even consider how to invest in your retirement using Bitcoin. Bitcoin? Retirement? Really?  Technology has powered rapid changes in our lives. Internet searches replaced encyclopedias. Smartphones replaced landlines. Netflix replaced Blockbuster.  Bitcoin isn’t sending traditional savings into retirement right now, but it’s worth investigating as part of your long-term financial planning. A Bitcoin refresher Just as the internet, smartphones, and Netflix enhanced our access to knowledge, communication, and movies, technology has opened the doors to a variety of different individual investments, including IRAs. Bitcoin first went public in 2009, when its enigmatic creator, Satoshi Nakamoto, shared the idea behind it. Featuring peer-to-peer online trading and a decentralized nature, Bitcoin grabbed the attention of tech-savvy people tired of traditional finance and banking. Bitcoin has plenty of fans who view the cryptocurrency as an ideal alternative to traditional cash or precious metal coins. Unlike other forms of wealth, Bitcoin doesn’t originate from, nor is it controlled by, any banking organization or government entity. Users can buy Bitcoin using fiat currency and store it in their Bitcoin wallets. In the cryptocurrency’s early days, individuals could mine bitcoins via computer algorithms, but these days buying is your best option. With Bitcoin, network processing joined via a common ledger has replaced the centralized control of a banking system. Any transaction gets recorded to a blockchain, which gets distributed to all user accounts. Bitcoin doesn’t need one gatekeeper because everyone with an account has access to oversight. You can use bitcoins to pay for various purchases, including food, travel, video games, music, and even charitable donations. You can’t walk into your favorite local spot and put some bitcoin down on the bar, but you can make online payments by sending a portion of your bitcoins to the seller’s address. Bitcoin also has a growing fan base in unbanked or underbanked areas, bringing added virtual financial services to locations where they’re desperately needed. You shouldn’t cut up all your credit cards in favor of Bitcoin just yet, though. But as Bitcoin gains popularity and shines as the gold standard of cryptocurrency, some investors want to make it part of their retirement portfolio. Some basics on investing for your retirement Before I jump into Bitcoin-funded retirement, let’s talk about traditional retirement wisdom and options. First up: when should you start saving for retirement? That’s an easy one. NOW. If you’re nearing the big 3-0, start now. If you’re in your 20s, start now. If you’re in your 40s, start yesterday. Since time travel isn’t possible, start — you guessed it — now. According to research from the Federal Reserve, 25% of people have nothing saved for retirement. That’s millions of people with no financial safety net other than Social Security.  You’re going to have a really tough time celebrating your retirement if you have no way to pay your bills. When you can’t even cover the basics, kicking back and enjoying your days without a desk or a boss will be next to impossible. That’s not who you want to be when you grow up. If you start saving for retirement at 25, you should have one to one-and-a-half times your salary socked away by the time you hit your mid-thirties. Are you on track to meet those guideposts? Great. If you don’t, you shouldn’t beat yourself up. You SHOULD start your retirement savings right away. What are some traditional retirement savings options? Traditional retirement savings options include: 401(k). An employer-connected account you build via pre-tax deductions from your paycheck. 403(b). Like a 401(k) for people who work for a non-profit organization or educational institution. IRA. Stands for Individual Retirement Account. They're not connected to your job, IRAs are open to everyone. You may find tax-deductible traditional IRAs, post-tax Roth IRAs, or SEP IRAs for anyone self-employed.  Bitcoin breaks with tradition The investment market tends to hold fast to tradition, though during uncertain economic times, savvy investors think about breaking with conventional practices in favor of more creative alternatives. Bitcoin was first on the scene and has earned the most name recognition among cryptocurrencies. Still, it’s not the only altcoin out there. Bitcoin was the pioneer, but you can currently find more than 4,000 cryptocurrencies out there. Other crypto includes: Ethereum (ETH). Litecoin (LTC). Cardano (ADA). Chainlink (LINK). Dash. Monero (XMR). Polkadot (DOT). Bitcoin Cash (BCH). Binance Coin (BNB). Ripple (XPR). Stellar (XLM). Tether (USDT). Tron (TRX). While Bitcoin is a financial newbie compared to precious metals, cash, stocks, mutual funds, and IRAs, we can’t ignore its mainstream appeal. Still, some worry about the cryptocurrency’s staying power and its volatility. While Bitcoin is not likely to replace any of the traditional retirement options, you may consider adding it to your post-employment planning. With Bitcoin, you can diversify your portfolio and add some excitement to your retirement savings. What is a Bitcoin IRA? Bitcoin IRAs are individual retirement accounts that enable you to invest in Bitcoin or other types of cryptocurrency. These Bitcoin alternatives are known as altcoins. While the Internal Revenue Service does not back any particular accounts for crypto, the organization views Bitcoin as equivalent to stocks and bonds for tax purposes. The decision to treat bitcoins and altcoins as property means a custodian is necessary for regulatory compliance. Most IRA custodians focus on more traditional assets, such as stocks, bonds, money markets, and CDs. However, as Bitcoin enhances its mainstream popularity, you’ll see more companies taking on this specialized role. Bitcoin IRAs are self-directed IRAs (SD-IRAs). These SD-IRAs are gaining traction, though they require more of your personal attention than other investments might. They also require you to choose a custodian to maintain the account (I’ll get to that in a minute). In addition to investments in assets like real estate, gold, silver, and tax liens, SD-IRAs can hold crypto.   You probably won’t see crypto investment offerings from your employer’s retirement plan in the near future. Bitcoin has a reputation for volatility. Since retirement plan sponsors are responsible for liability surrounding their featured investments, they most likely won’t take the risk. Crypto boasts of decentralization. No government agency regulates it, but global governments are starting to take notice as popularity increases. Given that the IRS considers crypto similar to stocks or bonds, many financial professionals don’t classify altcoins and other cryptos as distinct types of assets. Industry pros may be fonder of blockchain technology and its lasting potential than of crypto as an asset. How do you start making Bitcoin part of your retirement strategy? Remember, Bitcoin might be part of your retirement investment strategy. You wouldn’t close all of your accounts to put everything you have into one stock, no matter how hot it seems to be (at least you shouldn’t). The same is true of Bitcoin. When Bitcoin is a portion of your diversified retirement portfolio, you can withstand short-term concerns about its volatility while waiting for long-term gains. When you’re ready to add Bitcoin, use a Bitcoin IRA. You can go it alone, which requires some crypto homework, or you can enlist the help of a pro. When you choose to DIY, be sure to pay close attention to Internal Revenue Service regulations. Though Bitcoin itself is decentralized, the IRS imposes limits, and it bans certain transactions. You’ll also create a self-directed IRA and a limited liability company (also known as an LLC) to serve as the organization for purchasing and selling Bitcoin for IRA purposes. The do-it-yourself route is trickier due to complex compliance issues and the higher risk of theft. This route requires in-depth crypto knowledge plus serious financial and investment chops. Aka, it's not recommended. On the other hand, if you go with a professional, you get the advantages of diversifying your portfolio with Bitcoin without as much hassle or homework. Think of it like ordering takeout from a great restaurant—you get to enjoy the meal without doing all the prep work. Bitcoin IRAs require special skills, even for professionals. These crypto retirement vehicles not only require extensive knowledge of cryptocurrency trading but also of enhanced data protection and management. How do you start your Bitcoin IRA journey? With the extra attention that these alternative assets require, traditional financial services or investment firms don’t offer a Bitcoin IRA option (yet). You’ll need to find a firm to help you get started. Just as you would with any investment, you should do some background research. Every firm has unique qualities and requirements, and you want one that matches your investment vibe. Some excellent sources for Bitcoin IRA custodians include: BitcoinIRA. BitcoinIRA is the most established in the Bitcoin IRA game. It’s secure and features easy account setup and use. You need to invest a minimum of $3,000 to start. BitIRA. BitIRA stores digital assets offline for heightened security, and it backs its protection with unlimited insurance. You need $5,000 to open your account. iTrustCapital. With low fees and minimum investments, iTrustCapital is great for Bitcoin IRA newcomers. The minimum account balance is $2,500. CoinIRA. CoinIRA excels at user experience, offering an educational guide to cryptocurrency IRAs and dedicated consultants to guide you through the process. The minimum starting balance is high at $20,000. Equity Trust. Equity Trust boasts nearly 40 years of experience with self-directed IRAs, and now it offers crypto IRAs as well. The low starting balance of $500 makes it an attractive option for beginners. Alto. Alto features a variety of alternative investment options, including several types of crypto. With no minimum balance to start, no setup fees, and no extra exchange fees, it’s a good place to dabble. IRA Financial Trust. IRA Financial Trust touts a reputation built on user choice and minimal costs. It doesn’t require a minimum balance; plus, it gives you the power to choose your own crypto exchange. It’s perfect if you know about crypto but haven’t built a financial empire yet. Each of these sites offers Bitcoin, as well as other crypto trading and investment options. Each has different minimum account requirements and different fees. They all offer 24/7 access, crypto knowledge, and reliable reputations in this specialized space for alternative assets. Do a little online homework to see if one speaks to you and meets your crypto IRA needs. What are some advantages of a Bitcoin IRA? In the investment world, there are no absolutes. No investment type is all good or all bad. Each comes with advantages and disadvantages. Bitcoin IRAs are no exception. Benefits of adding this investment vehicle to your retirement planning include the following. Going global When you have Bitcoin, you hold global currency. The crypto is recognizable worldwide and works in the same manner wherever you may be. Growing potential Right now, Bitcoin and crypto have plenty of room to grow. Since Bitcoin hit the scene, it’s been on an upward trend surpassing other markets. If value accelerates rapidly, your Bitcoin IRA may have a positive impact on your retirement funds. Since your retirement is far off on the horizon, you can play the waiting game. Diversifying your portfolio A solid investment strategy relies on diversifying your retirement portfolio even if you’re sticking with more traditional types of investments. Diversity is even more crucial when you talk about alternative assets like Bitcoin or other forms of crypto. Adding a Bitcoin IRA brings fresh excitement to your portfolio and adds a layer of protection to your retirement savings in case of a drastic market downturn or financial upheaval that causes distress with traditional market products. Looking to the future Fans of Bitcoin IRAs believe playing the long game is worth it, which means putting their faith in crypto’s mainstream and financial growth. If you have four decades until retirement, you may be more willing to gamble with this part of your portfolio and put your money on altcoin’s future potential. Of course, nay-sayers continue to point out crypto’s instability and volatility.  Saving on taxes Using Bitcoin to invest in specific kinds of accounts may give you the power to steer clear of steep capital gains taxes, though you may still face other fees. When you have crypto as a regular taxable investment, capital gains tax will impact your purchase and sale transactions. When you use the tax shield of diversifying your assets and putting Bitcoin in a self-directed IRA coupled with a crypto wallet, you can lessen your tax burden. Whether you settle up with the IRS now or in the future depends on your choice of a Roth IRA or a traditional IRA. With Roth IRAs, you pay taxes at the start and your gains are tax-free. With traditional IRAs, you pay Uncle Sam when you withdraw the funds. Do Bitcoin IRAs have any drawbacks? Nothing’s perfect—though a great burger and fries come close. Of course, Bitcoin IRAs have some downsides: Doubling up When you choose a Bitcoin IRA, you will need a separate retirement account for your traditional investments. Just as conventional funds cannot handle Bitcoin, crypto custodians don’t manage stocks and bonds. To ensure a diverse portfolio, you’ll have to open and maintain at least two retirement accounts with different servicers for each of these asset classes. Navigating uncertainty Though Bitcoin’s popularity continues to rise, most experts still see crypto as a speculative investment subject to volatility and drastic value fluctuations. With thousands of cryptocurrency choices available, you can’t say for sure which will last and which will disappear unless you have magical powers. Some experts predict an overall crypto crash, while others foresee massive growth. Unless you have magical powers, you don’t know what the future will bring. If you discuss your concerns with a professional, you can choose a fund composed of a variety of crypto to alleviate some of the uncertainty. Lacking value metrics Unlike stocks, with crypto, you don’t have any share of corporate ownership backed by company earnings. Bitcoin and other altcoins have value in pricing that changes daily. Meeting the minimum Compared to more traditional IRAs, Bitcoin IRAs may require significant minimum investments. An online search of the different custodians will allow you to compare minimum investments to find one that works for you. Paying a price You may pay higher fees for a self-directed IRA. By comparing providers, you can find one with fees that suit your budget and comfort level. Don’t let the high costs at one company price you out of the game.  Limiting your options Certain custodians limit your power and choice, only giving you the option of trading on affiliated currency exchanges. Others allow more leeway and let you choose according to preference. If you’re in the know and desire a specific crypto exchange, check to see if your Bitcoin IRA custodian will give you that option. Counting your losses You already know the good news when it comes to Bitcoin IRA tax advantages. Ready for the bad news? With traditional investment accounts, if you suffer a capital loss, you recoup by deducting those losses or balancing out other gains. This type of recovery isn’t possible with Bitcoin IRAs because of their existing tax benefits. Keeping tabs Though the companies I mentioned above are custodians of your Bitcoin IRA, keep in mind that they’re still new and may not provide as much oversight as traditional brokers, advisors, or financial service firms do. The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) does not have any powers to supervise Bitcoin custodians. Remember, decentralization is in Bitcoin’s DNA. While these firms should have your best financial interests at heart, they do not have requirements to operate under the same fiduciary regulations as the more traditional players. Summary None of us knows what the future holds, but what’s life without a bit of risk? If you want to create some diversity and adventure in your retirement savings, now’s the time—especially if you have several decades before you get to cut the cake at your retirement celebration. Bitcoin IRAs may offer huge rewards, but they come with higher-than-normal risks. If you want to dabble in Bitcoin IRAs while mitigating potential losses, your best bet is to make sure that these alternative investments represent 10% or less of your retirement portfolio. Read more: Investing In Bitcoin: Everything You Need To Know Before You Buy The Top 10 Things You Need To Know About Bitcoin - Clay earrings

This craft is a great option for folks who want a smaller project that sells for a big profit.

Polymer clay earrings are especially trendy today, and there’s virtually an unlimited number of designs you can create. Geometric pieces (which you can find thousands of on Etsy) are extremely popular, but you can also branch out and think up unique designs.

Polymer clay is a great DIY material for a number of reasons; it’s non-toxic, quick-drying, durable, and incredibly easy to use. Plus, these stylish accessories typically sell for $10-$20 per pair.

14. Embroidery

Like macrame, embroidered goods are incredibly popular, and there are a number of ways to make your designs stand out.

To get started, pick up a basic embroidery hoop, some cotton embroidery floss, and a few extra tools, like needles and scissors. You can find simple designs online to learn various stitches, but eventually, you can create and sell your own unique designs, offering customizable products — like tote bags, t-shirts, hats, and more — or kits for interested consumers.

Many commercial embroidery shops charge by the stitch, but most embroiderers recommend different pricing for hand-embroidered goods. With this said, the price you charge should take not only the cost of your supplies into consideration but your time as well.

15. Marble ring dish

Some activities aren’t easy to do while wearing rings, like making homemade pizza dough or pulling weeds. Fortunately, there are beautiful products for those who want a dedicated place to store their rings, and you can be the one to make and sell them.

Marble ring dishes are a simple solution to the problem of “ring-averse” tasks, and you need just a few tools to make them, including an oven-safe mold, a rolling pin, and of course some clay. You can order clay on Amazon for around $12 or so and may even recoup your investment with the first sale!

Where to sell your handmade goods

There are a number of sites and stores to sell your handcrafted goods, both local and online. Here are a few great sites to consider listing your products:

  • Etsy.
  • Shopify.
  • eBay.
  • ArtFire.com.
  • Zibbet.
  • Bonanza.
  • Handmade Artists.
  • iCraft.
  • Craigslist (local and online).
  • Facebook Marketplace (local and online).
  • Instagram (local and online).

If you want to try and sell your crafts locally, check out the following options:

  • Farmer’s markets.
  • Flea markets.
  • Fairs and festivals.
  • Consignment shops.
  • Cafes and coffee shops.
  • Art galleries.

Many of the sites and locations listed above are great for selling homemade baked goods as well, including Etsy, Facebook Marketplace, farmer’s markets, coffee shops, and such.

Summary

If you’re looking for opportunities to earn a little extra cash on the side, the solution may be right in front of you.

There are plenty of fun hobbies like sewing and baking you can also pursue as a means of making money. Create your own candles and soaps for buyers who prefer ingredients they can pronounce. Or, try designing some handmade toys for your friends’ kids.

Not only will these crafty endeavors offer an outlet for creative expression, but they may also boost your savings too!

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